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Polio Working Group

Kid Risk

Radboud Duintjer Tebbens, PhD

Raboud Duintjer Tebbens, PhDDr. Duintjer Tebbens' research focuses on integrating quantitative tools such as risk and decision analysis, system dynamics modeling, uncertainty and probabilistic sensitivity analysis, and optimization to help inform global public health policies. He worked on his Master's thesis with Dr. Kimberly Thompson as a visiting scholar of the Kids Risk Project at Harvard School of Public Health on a retrospective cost-effectiveness analysis of historic polio vaccination programs in the United States. For his doctoral research and as a post-doctoral research associate, he and Dr. Thompson performed extensive research on polio and built a dynamic decision analytic model to evaluate the risks, costs, and benefits of global polio risk management strategies after the eradication of wild polioviruses globally with collaborators from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization. In 2008, he and Dr. Thompson received the Jay Wright Forrester Award from the System Dynamics Society for their influential work on modeling the economics of polio eradication versus control. In 2009, he joined the faculty at Delft University of Technology in The Netherlands as Assistant Professor in Risk and Decision Analysis to teach decision analysis and expert judgment and continue his research related to modeling polio, cholera, and pertussis. In 2010, he returned to Boston as Vice President of Kid Risk, Inc. to work full time on research related to dynamic, economic, and probabilistic analysis of pediatric risk management policies, with a particular focus on policy decisions aimed at achieving and maintaining a polio-free world.

Dominika Kalkowski, MS

Dominika Kalkowski, MSMs. Kalkowska is a researcher at Kid Risk, Inc. (www.kidrisk.org) and focuses her research on system dynamics, stochastic modeling, and optimization to help inform global public health policies. As an undergraduate, she studied Mathematics in Finance and Insurance at the University of Zielona Gora in Poland. She began working with Kid Risk on polio while pursuing her Master's degree in Mathematics with specialization in Risk and Environmental Modeling at Delft University of Technology in The Netherlands. Her Master's thesis focused on modeling the potential of undetected circulation of wild polioviruses. As a TU Delft doctoral student, she continues to work as a visiting scholar at Kid Risk. In addition to further exploring the management of undetected circulation of wild polioviruses with a focus on high-risk areas and the implications for surveillance, her doctoral work focuses on developing a model that will help countries identify optimal vaccination strategies as they manage their population immunity with respect to polioviruses.

Kimberly M. Thompson, ScD

Kimberly M. Thompson, ScDDr. Thompson is President of Kid Risk, Inc (www.kidrisk.org) and Professor of Preventive Medicine and Global Health, University of Central Florida, College of Medicine. Professor Thompson's research interests and teaching focus on the issues related to developing and applying quantitative methods for risk assessment and risk management, and consideration of the public policy implications associated with including uncertainty and variability in risk characterization. Drawing on a diverse background, she seeks to effectively integrate technological, social, political, legal, and economic issues into risk analyses that inform public policy and improve decision making in what she calls the "Age of Risk Management." She created and directed the Kids Risk Project at the Harvard School of Public Health between January 2000 and January 2009, at which point she created Kid Risk, Inc. as a self-standing, non-profit organization. Dr. Thompson joined the faculty of the University of Central Florida, College of Medicine in September 2012 as Professor of Preventive Medicine and Global Health, and she maintains long-standing interests in the issues related to variability in risk for sensitive sub-populations, particularly children, and the potential risk trade-offs associated with policies designed to protect them. She received her BS and MS in Chemical Engineering from M.I.T. and her Doctor of Science (Sc.D) degree from the Harvard School of Public Health. Recognized as a Society for Risk Analysis/Sigma Xi Distinguished Lecturer and popular keynote speaker, she is a Past-President and Fellow of the Society for Risk Analysis (SRA), which gave her its 2004 Chauncey Starr Distinguished Young Risk Analyst Award. In 2008, she and Dr. Duintjer Tebbens received the Jay Wright Forrester Award from the System Dynamics Society for some of the Kids Risk Project's research on polio.